Category Archives for "Business"

Reading about business, life and health

Reading about business, life,

entrepreneurship, and health

Whether reading for pleasure, to learn or just to get your head around what you’re doing at day to day level – there are a wealth of options. The following reading suggestions are based on my own experience, interests and bent for jargon-less information. I’m not sure about you, but I often go through phases of reading, where I’ll consume a book a week to swing to the extreme opposite end of the spectrum and be completely unable to finish a sentence.

This selection of reading material is, in my opinion, great as you can dip in and out chapter by chapter. Because let’s face it, not many of us have mastered the art of working 4 hours a week, successfully.

Getting started

Social Media for a New Age – Katie Brockhurst

Katie Brockhurst, also known as the Social Media Angel, is a consultant, coach and content creator and works with high profile and high vibe clients to rock their social media.

Katie’s work is a breath of fresh air, and if you’ve ever been exasperated when it comes to all the “shoulds” around using social media to get your message out there, you’re going to love her new book. 

 

The Four Hour Work Week – Tim Ferriss 

Reading this book started it all for me. A friend of mine gave it to me after he had finished reading it, and it changed my world. Tim Ferriss outlines his own business mistakes and creates an opportunity for fledgeling business start-ups and anyone who is in business to review whats working and how to improve the processes that are already in place. An oldie, but a very goodie.

Tools of Titans – Tim Ferriss

Tim Ferris has interviewed hundreds of incredibly successful people in different walks of life on his podcast. He has distilled these conversations into themes and it is remarkable how successful people have common themes which ripple across their lives. Tim has also personally tested them before listing them, so you know whether it is a diet or health routine or peak performance practice, it is repeatable in its success.

 

$100 Startup – Chris Guillebeau  

I first discovered Chris Guillebeau and the art of non-conformity about 15 years ago and became an avid fan. His books have been driven by a need to help people get started step-by-step, using non-business degree language.

In his own words, Chris says, because most books about business are too generic. The purpose of this book is to say, “OK, you’re ready to go for it? Great. Here’s how you actually do it.”

This isn’t a book about business, at least not as most people think about it. Instead, it’s a book about freedom. It’s for those who want to escape from corporate life, build something of their own to support their families, or just find a way to make more money.

Side Hustle – Chris Guillebeau

For some people, the thought of quitting their day job to pursue the entrepreneurial life is exhilarating.  For many others, it’s terrifying. After all, a stable job that delivers a regular paycheck is a blessing. And not everyone has the means or the desire to take on the risks and responsibilities of working for themselves.

But what if we could quickly and easily create an additional stream of income without giving up the security of a full-time job? Enter the side hustle. He offers a step-by-step guide that takes you from idea to income in just 27 days.

 

The Good Hustle – Dr Polly Mc Gee 

Small business and lean startup guru Dr Polly Mc Gee connects the basics of lean startup methodology with yoga. She advocates for businesses to be built on yoga principles, to help us lead a heart centred life.

A great resource for anyone who either practices yoga and wants to integrate it into their day to day life. Or for people who struggle with the hard sales, money-driven, FOMO pitches we are often faced with in business.

 

Start With Why – Simon Sinek    

Changing the focus from what to why has helped build better focused and more productive businesses. Reading Simon Sinek‘s book pushed me to rethink my motivations behind my own work. I had to really get comfortable with my why feeding into my what, and not vice versa.

Find Your Why – Simon Sinek

Find your why is the practical application to start with why. If you’re in the initial stages of start-up or losing your sparkle with your business this is a great place to regroup.

 

 

Get inspired by others’ journeys

 

Beyond the Label – Maureen Chicquet 

Maureen Chicquet outlines her very successful career and how she balanced it between her family and work commitments. With a degree in literature, she was not an immediate candidate for the corporate environment. However, she used her skills in listening to others and sheer bloody-mindedness to make her mark and carve out a very successful career. Super inspiring for anyone who has wondered what to do with their B. Arts.

 

Tribe of Mentors – Tim Ferriss   

Prolific business and life enjoyer, Tim Ferriss decided to write this book when he turned 40. A series of more than 100 interviews, Tim asked the same 11 questions to some of the world’s most successful people. To share their ideas around habits, learning, money, relationships, failure, success, and life. A great book to dip in and out as and when needed.

 

 

Finding Balance

 

Braving the Wilderness – Dr Brené Brown

Braving the wilderness was the first of Brené Brown‘s books that I’ve read. I was very familiar with her Ted Talks and often referenced her work when coaching, but this book. It was as though she’d written it about me.

Daring Greatly – Dr Brené Brown

Rising Strong is about recovering from failure, in order to not be held back by your past mistakes from trying again. In Daring Greatly, Brené outlined the value of being vulnerable, but it takes courage to do so and it entails risk. This book is about learning how to not shy away from that risk, stepping up and saying “Yes, let me try that again.” even after you’ve failed before.

Rising Strong – Dr Brené Brown

The process of rising strong is divided into three distinct phases, which, once you know the underlying principles of, you can recognize and move through again and again (and again) to get stronger with each of your failures.

The Gifts of Imperfection – Dr Brené Brown

The Gifts Of Imperfection shows you how to embrace your inner flaws to accept who you are, instead of constantly chasing the image of who you’re trying to be, purely because other people expect you to behave in certain ways. Living wholeheartedly is a process that never stops, it’s the opposite of a one-off choice. Courage, compassion, and connection are the gifts of imperfection. When you choose to be vulnerable with your shame, worry, guilt and imperfection, you allow yourself to experience connection and the gifts of imperfection.

 

Big Magic – Elizabeth Gilbert 

I like Elizabeth Gilbert, I enjoy her writing style and the way she presents her experiences, ideas and knowledge. After reading Big Magic it became my go-to gift for all my entrepreneurial and creative friends. Because the golden thread theme that runs through them all is – fear. Her letter to fear had me punching the air with excitement because quite frankly, fear has had too much power and influence over too many of us, for too long.

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck – Mark Manson

It’s not often that I find myself reading a book that swears more than I do. So, if you’re offended by swearing, then don’t bother. Essentially Mark Manson zooms in on what caring and not caring looks like. He gives examples of what to do, when and why. His book is essentially a no BS self-help book for people who usually hate self-help.

 

The Art of Not Falling Apart – Christina Patterson 

This book should be recommended reading. An honest upfront look at life, its twists, turns and a series of insights into the lives of other people, who will more often than not have had tougher life experiences than your own. Christina Patterson navigates her way through a series of interviews that focus on life’s losses and failures. A stark contrast to her career as a journalist focusing on the highs and wins of the rich and famous. An honest look at life. With a strong reminder to ride the waves of unpredictability with a healthy dose of humour and a glass of something strong (to take the edge off those not so funny in the moment, moments).

 

Strength in Stillness – Bob Roth

About four years ago I started Transcendental Meditation (TM) as a regular practice. Partly as a result of a painful break-up but also because the concept of meditation always appealed but I hadn’t found one that “worked” for me. Bob Roth, a self-proclaimed sceptic and a man who had a very specific idea of what he would be doing when he ‘grew up’ was the last person to think he’d become the CEO of the David Lynch Foundation and spend his career teaching meditation. Medical experts agree that the epidemic of stress is damaging our physical and emotional health at younger and younger ages. While there is no one single cure, the Transcendental Meditation technique is a simple practice that dramatically changes how we respond to stress and life’s challenges.

 

The Little Book of Hygge – Meik Wiking 

To quote one of our greatest philosophers of all time, Winnie the Pooh, when asked how to spell a certain emotion he said “you don’t spell it, you feel it”. This just about sums up the Danish concept of Hygge. Meik Wiking, the author of this book and CEO of The Happiness Research Institute in Copenhagen thinks one of the capabilities of his country’s citizens responsible for this high happiness standard is hygge. Hygge can best be described as our attitude or approach to happiness, alongside creating and cultivating an atmosphere for happiness. Meik Wiking outlines that hygge can be created anywhere, any time, its a mood, feeling, a sense of wellbeing.

 

 The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning – Margareta Magnusson

I was given this book after the death of my father, a well-meaning gesture. One that took me on an unexpected journey. Using the principles of clearing, decluttering and organising. Margareta Magnusson describes herself as between 80 and 100 takes the reader through the importance of Döstädning, literally, ‘death cleaning’ in Swedish. Essentially putting your life in order so your loved ones won’t have to. Quirky, but poignant look at death and its impact from dealing with secrets to sharing your heirlooms. Death clearing doesn’t have to be a sad experience and this practical guide proves just that.

 

And so the reading list is done, if you have anything to add or would like to find out more about the work I do contact me here – info (at) wayfairer.net

 

 

Download our free reading list here – if you want more information about our coaching and training services, please drop us an email – info (at) wayfairer.net or get in touch via social media here.

 

 

The stories we tell ourselves, and what you can do about them

the stories we tell ourselves

The stories we tell ourselves,

and what you can do about them

There are a few themes that are set on repeat in the Wayfairer HQ and one of them is about the stories we tell ourselves. Have you ever listened to the stories, the voices in your head tell you? Whether they’re self-doubts, you can’ts to hell yes’s and what ifs.

That voice or those voices have quite a strong influence over most of us. These stories can quite quickly and easily be mistaken for truths. They often have the power and capacity to incapacitate us, to swell that lump of fear and ring in the naysayers at the back of our minds.

Stories we tell are often not true

But it’s not all doom and gloom, because it at these junctions that growth and awareness can develop, unfold and can change the trajectory of the stories being developed or told in our heads.

No one other than you can hear this story. Which means no one other than you can change the tune, the tone, the content and make that story ring truer than its original shitty first draft. The shitty first draft that many accept as being the final polished and buffed piece that the world sees.

Dr Brené Brown talks of her internal dialogue as one that can either cripple her or fire her up to get on with her intention to keep showing up for the world. To continue writing, researching, presenting her ideas. Rewriting that story where she is the imposter and her story is full of doubt, fear, and vulnerability.

Sound familiar?

Recently I was talking with a friend about my ability to upsell, wax lyrical and prioritise my work for others and the work they do. However, when it comes to my own work, skill set, experience and abilities I am completely paralysed. By not only a very strong sense of fear and vulnerability (oh my goodness I don’t know everything, what if someone finds out!) But also imposter syndrome. Despite my training and educational background, over 15 years of experience and a university degree. I still seem to believe the story in my head. It reads like this – I’m not enough to do this work. I’ve not got enough experience. I have to get more qualifications. I need to work for other people, use their skills, experience, and business as a buffer to hide behind. To shield myself from being exposed as an imposter. These are huge excuses for not letting my own innate skills loose, and actually being brave enough to be successful. Which is contrary to the fear I tell myself of being afraid of failing. Which, I am not. Funnily enough.

“If we deny our stories, they own us,” says Brené Brown. “When we own our stories, we get to write the ending. When we deny our stories and disengage from tough emotions, they don’t go away – they own us, then they define us. Our job is not to deny the story, but to defy the ending – to rise strong, reckon with our story and rumble with the truth until we get to a place where we think, yes. This is what happened. This is my truth. And I will choose how this story ends.”

The shitty first draft (sfd)

When I first read about this in Brené Brown’s book, Rising Strong, it took a bit of digesting. Probably because my fears realised they were about to be caught out. The biggest question that came up was, Why would writing our stories be of any use? Eventually, it dawned on me that if our stories are out of our heads and in the real world positioned next to other items for scale and perspective we’d see what shitty stories they really are. How irrelevant they actually are in relation to not only the truth but also reality.

Fellow fear facer and author Elizabeth Gilbert wrote an exceptional letter to fear in her book Big Magic.

 

The stories fear tells us

 

The sfd

Not everyone is a storyteller, a writer or inclined to put their innermost thoughts on paper (or on a computer). I know there are days where I can’t even sit still long enough to write a sentence, so my suggestions are these. Take out the medium that you feel most at ease with communicating these stories.

  • writing, stories, poems, lyrics, emails, notes, permission slips
  • painting, drawing, sculpting, carving
  • photographs or videos
  • speak the stories through songs, a vlog, podcast, voice recording on your phone, conversation with another person

The SFD doesn’t need to be public, it just needs to be out of your head and exposed for what it really is. Bullshit.

I always say to my students. Ask the question. Get the clarification. Make the statement. You are not the only one in the room feeling that way. By raising your hand and putting yourself in a space of vulnerability I can guarantee that at least one other will feel the same. They will be moved to either support you and contribute to the story or write/speak their own version.

Like all good stories, they need space and time to be told. So carve out a niche of time and get those words or images out of your head. Start that shitty first draft and see it for what it is. Fear. Vulnerability. Self-doubt. Acknowledge it, take responsibility for it. But don’t believe it. Please, don’t believe it.

Reigning in the stories

Brené, who has interviewed artists, CEOs, parents, teachers and military leaders as part of her mission to uncover what it takes to lean into vulnerability in the name of being courageous, suggests a few key points in order to ‘rise strong’ in the face of a roadblock, stumble (or sinkhole).

1.    Acknowledge when you’re getting caught in emotion

The physiological signs of this can be different for everyone but may involve sweaty palms, tingly insides, dizziness, racing heart, rushing thoughts.

2.    Own your story 

Acknowledge your fears and worries to yourself and identify what they are, exactly. You will probably recognise that they’re somewhat exaggerated versions of the actual truth.

3.    Go searching for the truth

Take it gently, this might involve, confessing to the person your SFD is about or involving and saying something along the lines of ‘In my head, the story I’m telling myself is…’

4.    Create a new story

In most situations, it’s possible to identify what the real issue is. Overwhelm, stress, tiredness, PMS, and more are all contributors to the story. The rest? Pure confabulation.

5.    Challenge your themes

If you’re serious about getting up and out of the SFD vicious circle, review your SFDs and pull out the recurring themes that you’re concocting on a regular basis about situations in your life, about people, about circumstances. Acknowledge the underlying false beliefs that may be plaguing you.

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If you need more help or coaching please get in touch here or info(@)wayfairer.net

Framing stories.

 

 

 

Creating Competitions. How to get more Social with your Followers

Competitions

There aren’t many better ways to increase followers, engagement, brand visibility, and loyalty than with social competitions. Why? Because, if competitions are done well and with thought, they create buzz and genuine engagement.

A social competition or contest is essentially the promotion of your brand, business or product aimed specifically at your social media audience, both current and potential. Initially very popular on Facebook competitions have migrated to other social platforms with Instagram being the current platform of choice.

Creating competitions 

Contests continue to play a key part of businesses social strategy. Aimed at maximising engagement, the level of success, however, this is entirely dependant on you knowing your audience.

For example, research indicates that millennials are more inclined to engage in experiences, for which they are willing to pay. In the age of the savvy online customer, businesses have to be savvier in their approach to competitions.

Want to engage with Millennials and Gen X? Offer them an experience. Keen to boost your baby boomer and tech-shy client base encourage them to share, like, tag a friend and comment.

Gen Zers are the most likely to create specific content for you. With the rise of live broadcasts, encourage the creation of short clips and videos with your brand hashtag.

Social media contests can:

  • Inspire viral engagement (if your content is smart, astute, and fun consumers will want to share it with their network).
  • Boost engagement (CTA will encourage people to reach out and engage with you and your brand, business and products).
  • Build your email list (demonstrate that the business is providing value-add to their lives they’ll be rewarded for giving their email address).

88% of businesses are active on social media, which means you need to differentiate yourself. This translates to a lot of contests that are catching people’s attention and ultimately their business.

First of all, what should you consider when dreaming up a competition?

  • Unusual rules and ways to create engagement and action e.g. post a photo of the product with an unexpected item or particular colour related to your brand, rethink your prizes, know your audience and what they are looking for.
  • Experiences are increasingly sought after, why? Because they are harder to come by than products. The type of experience on offer will reflect the personality of the brand. This in turn will be linked back to you and the business. As the experience is being (for want of a better word) experienced you’ll receive UGC that can be repurposed. The perfect solution to generating more relatable content.
  • Social cause campaigns are the most successful form of competition at the moment. Partly because millennials are the most socially engaged demographic on social media. But also because they highlight what your business and brand are focused on, the community.
  • Comment giveaways, whilst these are not revolutionary they will appeal to those on social media who don’t want to be hooked into an online community or complicated forms of engagement. Polls and voting will inspire action, and that’s what we want!

All of this ultimately comes back to the new algorithms. How Facebook and Instagram (in particular) are looking at your engagement with followers. If your posts are driving action and reactions (loves, laughs, comments – not just likes). They’ll boost your content further, it’s time to think outside the jar of jellybeans.

Social media tools for running competitions – are they useful?

In a nutshell, yes. Why? Because they manage a whole range of components at the same time, and furthermore give you running feedback on engagement so you can adjust your strategy accordingly.

Our top three suggestions to investigate are:

  1. Gleam – they’re robust in their reporting and growth of some kind is assured, whether it’s your email list or social media following. A noteworthy aspect is an offer of a month trial before switching to paid plans that start at US$39/month
  2. Rafflecopter – considered to be the easiest to use, and they offer month to month plans, which for small businesses is appealing. Prices start at US$13/month for their basic plan
  3.  If Facebook is the main marketing platform for your business Woobox is the best option for managing social contests. Prices for the solo (small business plan) start from US$30/month.

And…the best Instagram #hashtags to use for competitions and promotions

1. #contest
2. #[yourbrand]contest
3. #contests
4. #contestalert
5. #contestentry
6. #sweepstakes
7. #[yourbrand]sweepstakes
8. #giveaway
9. #[yourbrand]giveaway
10. #giveaways
11. #winitwednesday
12. #competition
13. #win
14. #[yourbrand]win

Not sure how best to proceed for your business needs and customer engagement? Check out what other similar businesses are doing and how they’re engaging with their clients. Failing that drop us a line, we are always happy to delve into your social media and see what’s going on and how to best optimise your activity. Get in touch here.

Read our post on #Hashtags. Find out more about how to develop and use them to maximum effect on social media.

Competitions help create authentic connections between you, your business or brand and your audience.

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*This post was originally written by Wayfairer for Digital Dandy

Hashtags, what are they and how important are they, really?

Hashtags

Hashtags, what are they and how important are they, really? Every minute thousands of images, videos, sound clips and links are posted on social media platforms. In the increasingly crowded social media space businesses need to stand out amongst the crowd. Unless you have a huge following the likelihood of your posts being missed is quite high. This is where hashtags come into the picture (pardon the pun). Hashtags came into their own when Twitter was launched into the social scene. Nowadays they’re used as common practice across all media platforms.

Defining the hashtag

A hashtag is a keyword or phrase preceded by the hash symbol (#). Written within a post or comment to highlight it and facilitate a search for it. Essentially, by including hashtags in your post; it will be indexed by the social network and search engines so that it can be discoverable to everyone. Even if they’re not your followers or fans. For example, if your company is based in Hobart and your desired audience is both local residents and visitors to the city you could use the hashtag #hobartandbeyond to tap into the tourism sector of your client base.

Instagram (and social media in general) has been changing the rules of the hashtag game. And with that, we need to change our methods of engagement from the types and frequency of our hashtag usage. Focusing on more what, how, and when we post our content, so it counts most.

Hashtags

Hashtag heaven

Social media statistics will help you track your hashtag engagement

To put it simply, Instagram has divided their hashtags into three different categories, genericcommunity, and branded hashtags

Generic: 

These hashtags are the least specific of the three, but they do help with random discovery by users. However, the drawback is if you use the same hashtags too often your account could be flagged as ‘spam’ which you don’t want. This type of hashtag is more like a generalisation. And when it comes to business, it doesn’t work. Most businesses, or almost every business, have a niche (a specific type of product or service). And using a broad hashtag is akin to stabbing wildly in the dark. So, if you are going to use a generic hashtag, make sure you mix them up. Generic hashtag examples are: #travel, #love, #paradise

Community:

Related to the gathering of people who have similar interests or have similar content. Some examples of these communities are #fromwhereistand and #ihavethisthingwithfloors. To find these look at your followers and the types of accounts and people they follow. The narrower the scope of the hashtag, the more engaged the following.

Branded:

Unique to your business, branded hashtag, they can be your business name or tagline, specific product name. They can be helpful in encouraging UGC and increasing exposure specific to your business, services and products.

Don’t make your hashtags too long and hard to read, and, check your spelling.

Last but not least, you can now follow specific hashtags on Instagram, and so can your followers. This game changer will either boost or kill your visibility. Which is one of the reasons why using the relevant hashtag is so important. Once a hashtag is followed you’ll be given suggestions from Instagram of other hashtags, accounts, images, content that may be of interest. A form of organic discovery, using Instagram centric algorithms and hashtags. By following specific hashtags you’ll be able to see what other people are doing. Who is using the same hashtag and if this is on point for your business, brand and target audience.

Plus, you’ll gather a cache of hashtags relevant to your industry as deemed by Instagram. If that’s not the golden ticket, we don’t know what is!

A closer look at social platforms & what works best

Instagram

  • Between 3-5 hashtags in your description, and up to 10 in your comments.
  • To keep everything organised and visually appealing. It’s best to put your hashtags at the end of your caption preferably separated by either dots or asterisks. If you’re a bit OCD, you can also add your hashtags in a comment to your post (10 maximum).
  • Instagram’s algorithm has always favoured specific and relevant hashtags. Using hashtags that make sense is super important. That’s because users now have the power to edit your hashtagged content as something they don’t want to see.
  • Instagram insights will give you an outline of which hashtag groups are working best for you. From there you can narrow down your hashtag use to the ones that are most effective for you, and your business.

Facebook

  • Surprisingly the use of a hashtag is not very important on Facebook, it’s the title, heading or description that punches its weight.
  • Use hashtag groups, but keep them to an absolute minimum, a branded hashtag is the best course of action.
  • Content posted on Facebook can now be cross-posted onto Instagram if images are part of the post.

Pinterest

  • Don’t use more than 20 hashtags per pin (that’s a lot!) and they only work in the pin description.

Twitter

  • More than two hashtags have been shown to reduce visibility and reduce the tweets to being allocated as ‘spam’.
  • Unlike Instagram, hashtags can be used anywhere. In the tweet, whether as part of the text or afterwards, it makes no difference. #But #don’t #tag #every #word – #its #annoying #to #read.

Google+ and LinkedIn

  • The humble Hashtag can be used, but they don’t impact the visibility of the post. Again, focus on using branded hashtags only.
  • On LinkedIn, the most important feature is the fact that any activity on posts (e.g. likes, shares or comments) are broadcast on the wall of everyone who is following your company or you as an individual. An easy way to get exposure is to post regular content and encourage engagement.
Hashtags are go!

Hashtags help make you and your business more discoverable

 

 

 

 

 

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*This post was originally written by Wayfairer for Digital Dandy If you’d like help or some further information about coaching services in relation to digital media, social strategy and business presence online get in touch here  – info (at) wayfairer.net

 

 

 

 

GDPR + Your Business

The GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation) comes into effect today, May 25th, 2018. Whilst there has been a lot of hype about the updated regulations, the core essence of the policy is to protect the data of people collected by businesses.

LET US EXPLAIN….

General privacy policies are related to information attached to an individual and these can be broken down into:

  • email address
  • first and last names
  • date and place of birth
  • city, town and country
  • shipping and/or billing addresses
  • e-commerce information – banking or card details (there are additional Privacy Policy requirements for e-commerce sites)

Anonymous data, which is data that is not specifically personal but can be classified as ‘ personally identifiable information‘ when used in connection with other types of data that can lead to the identification of an individual.

Any business or website that collects data (as outlined above) is subject to this law and are applicable to the following platforms:

  • Websites
  • WordPress blogs (or other platforms)
  • E-commerce stores
  • Mobile apps – across all phone platforms (iOS, Android, Windows)
  • Facebook apps, desktop apps, Saas apps
  • Digital products or digital services

The GDPR is applicable to any individual or business that offers products or services to citizens of the EU and / or collects information from EU citizens. Regardless of where your business is located. This means that Australian based businesses that collect data, whether emails or data related to e-commerce transactions are required to comply with the GDPR

Part of the new regulation outlined in Article 12 of the GDPR stipulates how your business communicates with customers about the way personal data is processed, and it must be:

  • Intelligible and concise, in clear plain language that is easily understood
  • Easily accessible
  • Free of charge

In addition to the new GDPR regulation, more information is required in your business Privacy Policy, which like the GDPR needs to outline the following points –

A sample email marketing permission consent form

  • What personal information you collect
  • How and why you collect it
  • How you use it
  • How you secure it
  • Any third parties with access to it
  • If you use cookies
  • How users can control any aspects of this data

Dense legal jargon must be avoided, the purpose of the legislation is to allow individuals to easily understand what your privacy and data protection policies are.

Privacy Notices are also a new mandatory requirement, and these are a short, concise note to let the user know why you are collecting their data (see image for an example) A sample email marketing permission consent form

HOW TO GET STARTED

Enabling GDPR fields in your sign up forms will not make your business compliant. It’s a multi-step process

1. Set up a GDPR friendly sign up which has the following:

Sample information about how an individual can contact the DPO (Data Protection Officer)

  • Marketing permission text – advise sign-ups that you’re collecting their information and how you’ll use it.
  • Opt-in checkboxes for all of your channels – Customers can choose how and where they hear from you. Including the most common marketing channels you use e.g. email, direct mail, customised online advertising (Facebook, Instagram, Google ads)
  • Your company privacy policy and terms –Advise people where they can find your privacy policy and how they can contact you
  • Data storage policy – Let people know how you will store their data, if you plan to keep all data within a marketing platform. For example, MailChimp, provide links to their Privacy Policy and Terms of Use, to ensure both you and your email marketing provider are GDPR compliant.

2. Send a re-permission email to your existing email list. Most email marketing providers, like, MailChimp, have templates you can use to get contact permissions that are GDPR compliant. Once re-consent has been received this will be stored with your emails and collected user data.

3. Stay compliant with data management and security. This means enabling 2 Factor Authentication (known as 2FA) and allow users to modify their contact information through a link to their profile. This includes deleting all personal data.

 Sample information about how an individual can contact the DPO (Data Protection Officer)

GDPR data protection compliance

4. Provide information about how an individual can contact the DPO (Data Protection Officer) in your business (in the case of small businesses this is the business owner / sole trader who responsible for data management and compliance)

Creating these Privacy Policies and GDPR compliant guidelines can be daunting. There is an option to have a Policy created that is compliant with both Australian law and the updated GDPR. They are:

  • Privacy Policies – free for personal use and a fee for business, after inputting your information a Privacy Policy is created (please note that this is a generic privacy policy and may not cover all the legal requirements of your business and/or the updated regulations of the GDPR – if in doubt, please seek legal counsel) USD $29.99 per policy
  • Terms Feed – create legally binding agreements for users, they create Privacy Policies, T&Cs, EULA, Returns and Refunds, and Cookies policy. Prices start at USD$14.00 and increase according to the complexity of your website, services and products. This is considered to be the best option to cover all regulations – specifically GDPR, CalOPPA and Australian data protection laws)
  • WordPress offers a free plugin that generates a privacy policy for your WordPress site. Download the free Auto Terms of Service and Privacy Policy WordPress plugin from the WordPress plugin directory.

Please note, the above information is not legal advice. Please seek professional guidance should you have any doubts or queries as to how to protect and make your business compliant with the new Data Protection regulations both within Australia and internationally.

See our Privacy Policy here