Tag Archives for " business coach "

Reading about business, life and health

Reading about business, life,

entrepreneurship, and health

Whether reading for pleasure, to learn or just to get your head around what you’re doing at day to day level – there are a wealth of options. The following reading suggestions are based on my own experience, interests and bent for jargon-less information. I’m not sure about you, but I often go through phases of reading, where I’ll consume a book a week to swing to the extreme opposite end of the spectrum and be completely unable to finish a sentence.

This selection of reading material is, in my opinion, great as you can dip in and out chapter by chapter. Because let’s face it, not many of us have mastered the art of working 4 hours a week, successfully.

Getting started

Social Media for a New Age – Katie Brockhurst

Katie Brockhurst, also known as the Social Media Angel, is a consultant, coach and content creator and works with high profile and high vibe clients to rock their social media.

Katie’s work is a breath of fresh air, and if you’ve ever been exasperated when it comes to all the “shoulds” around using social media to get your message out there, you’re going to love her new book. 

 

The Four Hour Work Week – Tim Ferriss 

Reading this book started it all for me. A friend of mine gave it to me after he had finished reading it, and it changed my world. Tim Ferriss outlines his own business mistakes and creates an opportunity for fledgeling business start-ups and anyone who is in business to review whats working and how to improve the processes that are already in place. An oldie, but a very goodie.

Tools of Titans – Tim Ferriss

Tim Ferris has interviewed hundreds of incredibly successful people in different walks of life on his podcast. He has distilled these conversations into themes and it is remarkable how successful people have common themes which ripple across their lives. Tim has also personally tested them before listing them, so you know whether it is a diet or health routine or peak performance practice, it is repeatable in its success.

 

$100 Startup – Chris Guillebeau  

I first discovered Chris Guillebeau and the art of non-conformity about 15 years ago and became an avid fan. His books have been driven by a need to help people get started step-by-step, using non-business degree language.

In his own words, Chris says, because most books about business are too generic. The purpose of this book is to say, “OK, you’re ready to go for it? Great. Here’s how you actually do it.”

This isn’t a book about business, at least not as most people think about it. Instead, it’s a book about freedom. It’s for those who want to escape from corporate life, build something of their own to support their families, or just find a way to make more money.

Side Hustle – Chris Guillebeau

For some people, the thought of quitting their day job to pursue the entrepreneurial life is exhilarating.  For many others, it’s terrifying. After all, a stable job that delivers a regular paycheck is a blessing. And not everyone has the means or the desire to take on the risks and responsibilities of working for themselves.

But what if we could quickly and easily create an additional stream of income without giving up the security of a full-time job? Enter the side hustle. He offers a step-by-step guide that takes you from idea to income in just 27 days.

 

The Good Hustle – Dr Polly Mc Gee 

Small business and lean startup guru Dr Polly Mc Gee connects the basics of lean startup methodology with yoga. She advocates for businesses to be built on yoga principles, to help us lead a heart centred life.

A great resource for anyone who either practices yoga and wants to integrate it into their day to day life. Or for people who struggle with the hard sales, money-driven, FOMO pitches we are often faced with in business.

 

Start With Why – Simon Sinek    

Changing the focus from what to why has helped build better focused and more productive businesses. Reading Simon Sinek‘s book pushed me to rethink my motivations behind my own work. I had to really get comfortable with my why feeding into my what, and not vice versa.

Find Your Why – Simon Sinek

Find your why is the practical application to start with why. If you’re in the initial stages of start-up or losing your sparkle with your business this is a great place to regroup.

 

 

Get inspired by others’ journeys

 

Beyond the Label – Maureen Chicquet 

Maureen Chicquet outlines her very successful career and how she balanced it between her family and work commitments. With a degree in literature, she was not an immediate candidate for the corporate environment. However, she used her skills in listening to others and sheer bloody-mindedness to make her mark and carve out a very successful career. Super inspiring for anyone who has wondered what to do with their B. Arts.

 

Tribe of Mentors – Tim Ferriss   

Prolific business and life enjoyer, Tim Ferriss decided to write this book when he turned 40. A series of more than 100 interviews, Tim asked the same 11 questions to some of the world’s most successful people. To share their ideas around habits, learning, money, relationships, failure, success, and life. A great book to dip in and out as and when needed.

 

 

Finding Balance

 

Braving the Wilderness – Dr Brené Brown

Braving the wilderness was the first of Brené Brown‘s books that I’ve read. I was very familiar with her Ted Talks and often referenced her work when coaching, but this book. It was as though she’d written it about me.

Daring Greatly – Dr Brené Brown

Rising Strong is about recovering from failure, in order to not be held back by your past mistakes from trying again. In Daring Greatly, Brené outlined the value of being vulnerable, but it takes courage to do so and it entails risk. This book is about learning how to not shy away from that risk, stepping up and saying “Yes, let me try that again.” even after you’ve failed before.

Rising Strong – Dr Brené Brown

The process of rising strong is divided into three distinct phases, which, once you know the underlying principles of, you can recognize and move through again and again (and again) to get stronger with each of your failures.

The Gifts of Imperfection – Dr Brené Brown

The Gifts Of Imperfection shows you how to embrace your inner flaws to accept who you are, instead of constantly chasing the image of who you’re trying to be, purely because other people expect you to behave in certain ways. Living wholeheartedly is a process that never stops, it’s the opposite of a one-off choice. Courage, compassion, and connection are the gifts of imperfection. When you choose to be vulnerable with your shame, worry, guilt and imperfection, you allow yourself to experience connection and the gifts of imperfection.

 

Big Magic – Elizabeth Gilbert 

I like Elizabeth Gilbert, I enjoy her writing style and the way she presents her experiences, ideas and knowledge. After reading Big Magic it became my go-to gift for all my entrepreneurial and creative friends. Because the golden thread theme that runs through them all is – fear. Her letter to fear had me punching the air with excitement because quite frankly, fear has had too much power and influence over too many of us, for too long.

The Subtle Art of Not Giving a Fuck – Mark Manson

It’s not often that I find myself reading a book that swears more than I do. So, if you’re offended by swearing, then don’t bother. Essentially Mark Manson zooms in on what caring and not caring looks like. He gives examples of what to do, when and why. His book is essentially a no BS self-help book for people who usually hate self-help.

 

The Art of Not Falling Apart – Christina Patterson 

This book should be recommended reading. An honest upfront look at life, its twists, turns and a series of insights into the lives of other people, who will more often than not have had tougher life experiences than your own. Christina Patterson navigates her way through a series of interviews that focus on life’s losses and failures. A stark contrast to her career as a journalist focusing on the highs and wins of the rich and famous. An honest look at life. With a strong reminder to ride the waves of unpredictability with a healthy dose of humour and a glass of something strong (to take the edge off those not so funny in the moment, moments).

 

Strength in Stillness – Bob Roth

About four years ago I started Transcendental Meditation (TM) as a regular practice. Partly as a result of a painful break-up but also because the concept of meditation always appealed but I hadn’t found one that “worked” for me. Bob Roth, a self-proclaimed sceptic and a man who had a very specific idea of what he would be doing when he ‘grew up’ was the last person to think he’d become the CEO of the David Lynch Foundation and spend his career teaching meditation. Medical experts agree that the epidemic of stress is damaging our physical and emotional health at younger and younger ages. While there is no one single cure, the Transcendental Meditation technique is a simple practice that dramatically changes how we respond to stress and life’s challenges.

 

The Little Book of Hygge – Meik Wiking 

To quote one of our greatest philosophers of all time, Winnie the Pooh, when asked how to spell a certain emotion he said “you don’t spell it, you feel it”. This just about sums up the Danish concept of Hygge. Meik Wiking, the author of this book and CEO of The Happiness Research Institute in Copenhagen thinks one of the capabilities of his country’s citizens responsible for this high happiness standard is hygge. Hygge can best be described as our attitude or approach to happiness, alongside creating and cultivating an atmosphere for happiness. Meik Wiking outlines that hygge can be created anywhere, any time, its a mood, feeling, a sense of wellbeing.

 

 The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning – Margareta Magnusson

I was given this book after the death of my father, a well-meaning gesture. One that took me on an unexpected journey. Using the principles of clearing, decluttering and organising. Margareta Magnusson describes herself as between 80 and 100 takes the reader through the importance of Döstädning, literally, ‘death cleaning’ in Swedish. Essentially putting your life in order so your loved ones won’t have to. Quirky, but poignant look at death and its impact from dealing with secrets to sharing your heirlooms. Death clearing doesn’t have to be a sad experience and this practical guide proves just that.

 

And so the reading list is done, if you have anything to add or would like to find out more about the work I do contact me here – info (at) wayfairer.net

 

 

Download our free reading list here – if you want more information about our coaching and training services, please drop us an email – info (at) wayfairer.net or get in touch via social media here.

 

 

Hashtags, what are they and how important are they, really?

Hashtags

Hashtags, what are they and how important are they, really? Every minute thousands of images, videos, sound clips and links are posted on social media platforms. In the increasingly crowded social media space businesses need to stand out amongst the crowd. Unless you have a huge following the likelihood of your posts being missed is quite high. This is where hashtags come into the picture (pardon the pun). Hashtags came into their own when Twitter was launched into the social scene. Nowadays they’re used as common practice across all media platforms.

Defining the hashtag

A hashtag is a keyword or phrase preceded by the hash symbol (#). Written within a post or comment to highlight it and facilitate a search for it. Essentially, by including hashtags in your post; it will be indexed by the social network and search engines so that it can be discoverable to everyone. Even if they’re not your followers or fans. For example, if your company is based in Hobart and your desired audience is both local residents and visitors to the city you could use the hashtag #hobartandbeyond to tap into the tourism sector of your client base.

Instagram (and social media in general) has been changing the rules of the hashtag game. And with that, we need to change our methods of engagement from the types and frequency of our hashtag usage. Focusing on more what, how, and when we post our content, so it counts most.

Hashtags

Hashtag heaven

Social media statistics will help you track your hashtag engagement

To put it simply, Instagram has divided their hashtags into three different categories, genericcommunity, and branded hashtags

Generic: 

These hashtags are the least specific of the three, but they do help with random discovery by users. However, the drawback is if you use the same hashtags too often your account could be flagged as ‘spam’ which you don’t want. This type of hashtag is more like a generalisation. And when it comes to business, it doesn’t work. Most businesses, or almost every business, have a niche (a specific type of product or service). And using a broad hashtag is akin to stabbing wildly in the dark. So, if you are going to use a generic hashtag, make sure you mix them up. Generic hashtag examples are: #travel, #love, #paradise

Community:

Related to the gathering of people who have similar interests or have similar content. Some examples of these communities are #fromwhereistand and #ihavethisthingwithfloors. To find these look at your followers and the types of accounts and people they follow. The narrower the scope of the hashtag, the more engaged the following.

Branded:

Unique to your business, branded hashtag, they can be your business name or tagline, specific product name. They can be helpful in encouraging UGC and increasing exposure specific to your business, services and products.

Don’t make your hashtags too long and hard to read, and, check your spelling.

Last but not least, you can now follow specific hashtags on Instagram, and so can your followers. This game changer will either boost or kill your visibility. Which is one of the reasons why using the relevant hashtag is so important. Once a hashtag is followed you’ll be given suggestions from Instagram of other hashtags, accounts, images, content that may be of interest. A form of organic discovery, using Instagram centric algorithms and hashtags. By following specific hashtags you’ll be able to see what other people are doing. Who is using the same hashtag and if this is on point for your business, brand and target audience.

Plus, you’ll gather a cache of hashtags relevant to your industry as deemed by Instagram. If that’s not the golden ticket, we don’t know what is!

A closer look at social platforms & what works best

Instagram

  • Between 3-5 hashtags in your description, and up to 10 in your comments.
  • To keep everything organised and visually appealing. It’s best to put your hashtags at the end of your caption preferably separated by either dots or asterisks. If you’re a bit OCD, you can also add your hashtags in a comment to your post (10 maximum).
  • Instagram’s algorithm has always favoured specific and relevant hashtags. Using hashtags that make sense is super important. That’s because users now have the power to edit your hashtagged content as something they don’t want to see.
  • Instagram insights will give you an outline of which hashtag groups are working best for you. From there you can narrow down your hashtag use to the ones that are most effective for you, and your business.

Facebook

  • Surprisingly the use of a hashtag is not very important on Facebook, it’s the title, heading or description that punches its weight.
  • Use hashtag groups, but keep them to an absolute minimum, a branded hashtag is the best course of action.
  • Content posted on Facebook can now be cross-posted onto Instagram if images are part of the post.

Pinterest

  • Don’t use more than 20 hashtags per pin (that’s a lot!) and they only work in the pin description.

Twitter

  • More than two hashtags have been shown to reduce visibility and reduce the tweets to being allocated as ‘spam’.
  • Unlike Instagram, hashtags can be used anywhere. In the tweet, whether as part of the text or afterwards, it makes no difference. #But #don’t #tag #every #word – #its #annoying #to #read.

Google+ and LinkedIn

  • The humble Hashtag can be used, but they don’t impact the visibility of the post. Again, focus on using branded hashtags only.
  • On LinkedIn, the most important feature is the fact that any activity on posts (e.g. likes, shares or comments) are broadcast on the wall of everyone who is following your company or you as an individual. An easy way to get exposure is to post regular content and encourage engagement.
Hashtags are go!

Hashtags help make you and your business more discoverable

 

 

 

 

 

____________

*This post was originally written by Wayfairer for Digital Dandy If you’d like help or some further information about coaching services in relation to digital media, social strategy and business presence online get in touch here  – info (at) wayfairer.net