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Digital nomad: You don’t have to be in your 20s to be one

Digital nomad, a word, a concept that seems to be floating around the internet with increasing regularity often accompanied by images of tropical locations with twenty-somethings looking outrageously tanned and healthy frolicking in hipster juice bars with oversized headphones and all the latest tech.

Sound familiar? Thought it might.

It also could make people feel that if they didn’t fit that demographic then being a digital nomad is not the right fit for them.

That raises the question, what is a digital nomad?

Digital nomads are people who are location independent and use technology to perform their job. Digital nomads work remotely (telecommute), which is now economically possible due to cheap internet access, smartphones and voice over internet protocol (VoIP) to keep in contact with clients and employers. (def: invevstopedia.com)

That’s the technical definition from Investopedia, from which we can see that a digital nomad does not need to be of a certain age, or have a passion for tropical islands or hot climates. Essentially, digital nomadism is about doing your work from where you’d prefer, whether that is from home, a café, co-work space, airports, hotels or a juice bar.

The digital nomad’s office equipment

I am a digital nomad

I work remotely, every day. And often not in tropical locations, mainly due to my other life commitments. At Christmas last year I worked in a cabin in the mountains in Norway, doing a few hours after everyone left to go skiing and then heading out at whatever time suited me to ski, play and enjoy the landscape.

Normally, I live in a remote village in Spain, where jobs are scarce (the region has 40% unemployment, and those who do have jobs are either tourism based and thus seasonal, family business or move to larger cities in the region). I moved there to escape city life, I’d had enough of 15 hour days, high-stress levels, manipulative managers, internal politics and the increasing cost of living. At the end of the day, I often wondered, what am I doing all this for?

Between living in London and moving to Spain, I returned home to Sydney, where I spent six months working for a training agency streamlining their systems and processes, at the end of that contract I was ready to travel again. I renegotiated my role to become a content writer for them, thus creating a digital nomad role for myself. I proceeded to travel for the following year working remotely. In Spain, other options presented themselves, coaching and training online, teaching English VoIP, editing and writing.

Essentially, being a digital nomad is working from somewhere other than an office within structured office hours.

Is there a future for digital nomadism?

By the year 2035, it has been predicted that there will be 1 billion digital nomads world-wide. Why? Because we’re swapping corporate structure for flexibility, independence to work within our own life structure – whether that’s kids, gym class timetables or our partners, doesn’t matter. Plus, employers are admitting that finding local talent isn’t always possible. Large companies such as Dell are aiming to have 50% of their 140,000 employees location independent by 2020, acknowledging that remote workers reduce their real estate, and environmental footprint (imagine how many extra commuters are off the road at peak hour).

Research has found that productivity increases when we’re given the freedom to create our own schedule – not everyone is productive between 9-5. Flexibility also allows people to develop their own passion projects, cultivate further knowledge and their ideal working conditions. Gallup’s report, State of the American Workplace illustrated that more employees in the United States were working remotely and reported to feeling more engaged at work, especially those who spent 3 or more days out of the traditional office environment. Basically, when people opt to work remotely, it’s beneficial for business profits, the planet, and people.

What career options are there?

Where does that leave you? With options. The digital nomad lifestyle is achievable and if you manage it well and set up clear boundaries between your work and home life, you’re in for an excellent change in your work lifestyle.

Need some ideas of what you might be able to do or consider doing:

Need ideas? Grab your copy today on Amazon or in the Wayfairer shop.

 

  • Photography
  • Counselling, Coaching, Training
  • Web-Based Technologies
  • Digital Marketing
  • Editing, Journalism, Writing
  • Information Technology
  • Design
  • Accounting and Finance
  • Programming
  • Administration / Virtual Assistant
  • Teaching and Education
  • Sports, Fitness, and Wellness
  • Food and Nutrition

Resources:

There are plenty of resources and areas in which digital nomads are in demand. You just need to decide how you’re going to make the digital nomad lifestyle work for you.

Get clarity on how you can create your version of the ‘digital nomad’ – for more info email: info@wayfairer.net or click here to reserve your 30 minute 1:1 session.

Packing the right tool kit for spiritually inclined travelers – 9 must have tools to have with you on the road

Packing the right tool-kit for spiritually inclined travelers – 9 must have tools to have with you on the road

Maintain your balance when you travel

Spiritually inclined packing list!

Packing list for the spiritually inclined, not really a list limited to those spiritually minded, but anyone who recognizes that sometimes we need extra help. In my experience after traveling for a long period of time, I get overwhelmed. Be it unsettled or tired. Often the result is that I find it hard to make decisions, clarify what I’m doing, where I’m going next, who I can trust and so on. If I’m not able to maintain rhythms of work, sleep, and healthy food it’s hard to be clear about what’s going on, all the time.

For example, I adventured around Myanmar a few years ago. One part of the trip I traveled by overnight bus to the north of the country where I was woken up at 3.30 in the morning. The bus was supposed to arrive at 7 am but arrived 3.5 hours early. I got hustled off into a pitch black street, with no real idea what is going on and where I was. As the bus pulled away, all I could see where the two rear lights disappearing in the darkness. Half asleep and disoriented, I had to make a decision. In this moment, it was which way to walk and find somewhere to stay (there were no taxis or living souls, and the bus had stopped on the side of a road rather than at a bus station).

Needless to say, most cities are quiet at 3.30 in the morning you can imagine the village was completely dead. Even the street dogs were silent. Without a proper map, idea, or even adequate lighting I reached for my ‘tool-kit’ and answered the pressing question ‘Where do I go now? Left or Right? My answer was ‘left’ and so, to the left I walked and into what would be the exact town I wanted to be in and to the only place that had someone available to talk to and with an available room at 4 am.

When we travel occasionally we have to make snap decisions about the best thing to do in a situation, quickly. Sometimes when your brain is not making any sense whatsoever due to stress, lack of sleep, or overstimulation, the reason doesn’t matter, occasionally we all need some secondary assistance. This is where my ‘tool-kit’ comes in. What did I use at 3.30 in the morning to make my decision? Kinesiology.

Muscle testing with Kinesiology

Kinesiology – muscle testing, brought into practice by Donna Eden. An energy healer who started asking her body what it needed, wanted, liked (or not) and from this, the practice of kinesiology was developed into a technique used to ask questions.

– Start by balancing yourself and taking a few deep breaths and firmly planting your feet on the ground, connecting with the universal energy flow, with your dominant hand connect the tips of your little finger and thumb together to create a strong circular connection. With your non-dominant hand create a pincer (crab claw) with your thumb and forefinger.

Your dominant hand is generally the hand you write with and non-dominant is your other hand.

– Start by asking two questions that have definitive yes and no answers, for example,

  • Is my name ___________ insert your name (the answer will definitely be yes)
  • Is my name ____________ select a random name (the answer will definitely be no)
    Use kinesiology to muscle test for information.

    How to get ready to muscle test for answers.

– When you ask each question create the loop with your dominant hand and the pincer with your non-dominant hand.

– Ask the question to confirm for the ‘yes’result – Is my name ___________? (insert your name)

– As you ask the question put your non-dominant pincer fingers in the circle made with your little finger and thumb of your dominant hand, insert your ‘pincer fingers’ into the loop and try to open your fingers with your other fingers – if the loop on your dominant hand doesn’t open the answer is YES.

– Now repeat the process with your ‘no’ question – Is my name ____________? (select a completely random name)

– As you ask the question put your non-dominant pincer fingers in the circle made with your little finger and thumb of your dominant hand, insert your ‘pincer fingers’ into the loop and try to open your fingers with your other fingers – if the loop opens easily, this means NO.

– For me, for example, if my fingers open easily as though I have no power or strength, this means, no. If my fingers open a little or with some difficulty, this means maybe, and best to find another solution. If I can’t open the loop at all, it means yes.

Asking questions about food

– helpful for those with food allergies* –

– You can ask all sorts of questions, related to food, places to stay, people, anything and everything. One good thing to remember is that the body doesn’t lie!

– To ask questions about food, its best to hold a piece of food so your body can feel it’s energy. Try it with a sachet of white sugar, then a piece of fruit or vegetable and see the difference in your body’s response to the question.

– how to keep your inner balance when you’re on the road –

Refine your packing list with the spiritual must have tools.

Spiritual tool box packing list essentials.when you’re on the road –

  • Pendulum – pendulums are a great tool for asking yes and no questions, again, center yourself and breath, go within and listen to your inner voice. Ask basic yes and no questions that you know are either yes or no (use the examples above) and once you have determined the movement from the pendulum that indicates yes, no and maybe – for example, turning anti-clockwise for no, turning clockwise for yes and straight swinging line for maybe. Pendulums take some time and practice, but well worth the time! Couple the answers with your kinesiology to see if you get the same answers.
    I usually wear a pendulum on a necklace, I particularly love the pendulums from Pound Jewelry. But you can use anything, a ring on a necklace or piece or string with a weighted end. What's important is the connection you have and how you ask the question.

    I usually wear a pendulum on a necklace, I particularly love the pendulums from Pound Jewelry. But you can use anything, a ring on a necklace or piece or string with a weighted end. What’s important is the connection you have and how you ask the question.

  • Tarot / Oracle deck – When packing for a trip I always take one deck of cards with me, historically tarot, but recently I have been using oracle cards more, so next time, who knows – maybe the oracle will come with me instead. I like to use the beautiful Vision Quest tarot deck, with amazing drawings with Native American wisdom. I mentioned before, oracle decks feature more in my daily practice. Colette Baron-Reid’s Wisdom of the Oracle deck has beautiful illustrations and her collaborative oracle set with Pam Grout, the author of  (E-squared) and (E-cubed). The Oracle of E is much simpler and straightforward, plus it has Pam’s wonderful tongue in cheek humor.
  • Tuning fork – personally when I travel I notice I pick up all sorts of ‘stuff’. From other people’s energy to negative ideas or thoughts, thus I always have a tuning fork with me. The tuning fork is a marvelous tool to refine and clear your energy if it’s not possible to have an Epsom salt bath, swim in the sea or use sage and palo santo to clear the energy of the space or yourself. Easy to include in your packing as it’s not bulky or heavy.
  • Mala beads – otherwise known as prayer beads, are strands of up to 108 beads used to create and maintain a rhythm whilst praying or meditating. Used in many different cultures with different names, Roman Catholics use the Rosary with 54 beads and five additional beads. Islamic prayer beads known as Misbaha or Tasbih have either 99 or 33 beads. Sikhs and Buddhists use Mala with 108 beads.
  • Palo Santo –  meaning literally “holy wood” a tree native to the subtropical and tropical regions of the Americas, burned as incense by the Incas and indigenous people of the Andes region. Palo Santo has the ability to clear energy similar to White Sage and Cedar. It’s also good for keeping away mosquitoes! If you’re packing to go to Australia or New Zealand you won’t be able to take Palo Santo with you. You’ll need to purchase some when you are there.  Check customs regulations before you travel. Palo Santo is also available as a therapeutic oil, which is an alternative to carrying a small piece of wood.
  • Yogo tall ultralight yoga mat made from natural tree rubber and cotton

    Yogo tall ultralight yoga mat made from natural tree rubber and cotton.

    Yoga travel mat – If you’re not really into yoga, in my opinion, there is no point taking a mat. But if you are a yogi and want to continue your practice without lugging a huge and heavy mat around with you, have a look at the Yogo ultralight mat. Just 1kg folding down to 30 x 7.5 x 12cm. The ultralight is 61cm wide and 173cm long with a thickness of 1.5mm made from natural tree rubber and cotton. The Yogo long ultralight mat is slightly heavier at 1.5kg but it’s 182cm long. Which for tall people like me is a better length!

    – Packing virtual tools –

  • Online meditations – we’ve all got a stash of meditations on our phone, kindle, tablet or computer. Meditations are a great tool to disconnect from the space we’re in. Regardless of whether it’s metaphorically or physically. Plus, they weigh nothing, an excellent addition to your packing list.
  • Kindle e-books –  I think of my kindle as an “escape hatch”. Disappearing into another world in the turn of a virtual page. I have the most basic version of the Kindle. I don’t want to be distracted by wifi or the web. Reading for me is serious business and when I’m in the zone, I don’t want to be distracted.

Packing lists have to be adapted to each person’s needs and requirements, but these nine items are a good starting point. Happy wayfairing and please leave a comment below to tell me what you tools you’re packing in your tool kit.

* please note that this is not a substitute for medical advice, please do not consume things that you know are not healthy for your body.

1 What the f*^k do I do now? Dealing with the dreaded c-word. Change.

Managing the C-word. Change

Change. Dealing with the dreaded c-word and answering the question – What the fuck do I do now?

The c-word, change and the question, “what the fuck to I do now?” has been circulating in my head the last few days. And today, I’ve been thinking about my next steps, which is a state I am sure that everyone can relate to.
Recently, I found out that I need to move from where I live. Which is both a great and annoying thing. It’s great because I haven’t been entirely happy for a while, but convenience prevailed. It’s annoying because I’m not quite ready to move. I’ll be honest, finding a house can be a pain in the butt. It forces you to look at all the things in your life that need to be evaluated, which can be an uncomfortable activity if you’ve let things lie for a while, like I have.
It’s unsettling to receive unexpected news, even if it is for the highest good. Thinking about the next steps always bring up all sorts of questions. The most obvious being where to live, which for someone who is prone to wandering, a tricky question to answer. Where to find this new location called home, even if only temporarily.

Remember, you’re exactly where you need to be

The C-word…change

Change. How a 6-letter word can strike so much fear bewilders me. Change. Change can be good, fun, terrifying, nerve-wracking and also liberating. But change makes you look at your life through a microscope. For example, change requires you to look at your finances and getting an idea of what you can and can’t afford to do. And like most people, I’m not all that excited about keeping my financial house tidy. Which is ridiculous as money is essential and offers an element of freedom if you choose to accept it. Plus, keeping things organised allows greater accountability which leads to flow, and with flow comes abundance.

Yes, but what about all the other stuff in my life?

Then comes the age-old question, am I really happy in all aspects of my life? We have four main pillars in our lives – health, work/study/self-development, relationships and home, if one of those pillars is out of alignment then we struggle to find balance. And that imbalance will prevail until the pillar is brought back into balance. We’re only as strong and balanced as our weakest pillar, and finding out what needs to change or healed will help bring back that balance and strength. With balance and strength comes clarity and from clarity, answers to our questions.
Sometimes more than one pillar is out, which often is the case when we’re stressed, unhappy or unwell. Each pillar has an effect on the next. Not enjoying your job, this affects your relationships and consequently your health. Fear often drives our decisions, fear, for example, of quitting the job we dislike so much. Because without the job we can’t pay for our home unless we have support from our relationships – familial, or otherwise. But, money can be a cause of tension, especially if one person feels like they contribute more than the other. And so it continues around the pillars. Do you see the circle we so easily get caught up in? Amazing how everything is so interlinked.

So I’m out of balance, what do I do now?

All of this brings me back to the question I am currently asking myself. What the fuck do I do now? Well, honestly I don’t know, as the circumstances are different every time and for each person. What I do know is that finding the answer to situations require different approaches. Sometimes mediation or oracle cards work, other times it’s journaling or talking. Getting everything out of our heads is generally a good place to start. Fears get smaller, ideas bigger. Sometimes the more logical approach of the list of pros and cons of any decision works, but that requires options that you know are available.
But what if you don’t even know what the options are? Enter, the life recipe. In these moments I write a life recipe, a process that focuses me on what I absolutely have to have in my life, what’s negotiable and what I do not want. In fact, I’m doing one now with the question, what the fuck do I do now? Because quite frankly my options are vastly different from one another and I have no idea where to start other than with a recipe for the next chapter of my life.

Are you ready to make your life recipe?

Creating space for change

Download your copy of the life recipe workbook for free here.

Getting started requires some time, space

Create your ideal life with Wayfairer’s Life Recipe workbook, start planning and achieving your milestones!

and ideas. Gather momentum by focusing on what you do want in your life. Was wild and crazy as your ideas may sound. The best version of these wild ideas for you will appear care of your intention and the universe. The negotiable comes next, what would be great to have but non-essential, sometimes these ideas are the stepping stones to the must haves. And last, but certainly not least come the things that you’re not interested in having in your life, it’s good to be clear about what you’re not interested in moving towards, in all forms.

Once you’ve completed the three sections, leave the workbook for a few days. Let the ideas settle before reviewing your life recipe again, leave them to marinate in the back of your mind. After a few days, make some time and space to review the life recipe again. You might discover that you want to make some changes or tweak what you wrote, sometimes what sounds good one-day shifts to being not so cool the next.

Setting yourself up for success

Now, it’s action stations. Start planning your moves, to make things happen. Starting from the first few months, six and then nine months. Break down your ideas into smaller bite-size chunks, so they don’t seem so bloody scary. If however, your time scale is less than that you need to create timelines that reflect what time you have. From here it’s about support, ask your best friend or person who will hold you accountable to be present and hold the space for you to create this recipe. Report back to them, tick things off the list put a big fat line through the things you’ve done. Celebrate the steps you take, even if they’re sideways, backward, or diagonal. You’re exactly where you need to be.